How Not To Spend Your Time

“Spend your time in nothing which you know must be repented of; on nothing which you might not pray for the blessing of God;  in nothing which you could not review with a quiet conscience on your dying bed; in nothing which you might not safely and properly be found doing if death should surprise you in the act.”

—  Richard Baxter

Hollow Words

“Every abstract word is hollow until we pour life into it. Honor, glory, sacrifice, loyalty, love, joy, peace, courage and endurance, faith and faithfulness, democracy and brotherhood, justice and mercy- what are these?

Words. Abstract words. Hollow words- until we fill them with deeds, with life, and hence with meaning…

The great words of the Christian faith—grace, forgiveness, redemption, faith, hope and love—are all hollow words until we pour our Christian experience into them.

Yes, the great words are hollow; and yet filled full of life, they could shake the world again as they have done in the past, not as disembodied sounds, however correct, but as poured-out life penetrating to the heart of the world.”

—  J. Wesley Ingles

Whose Neighbor Are You?

One day, a rule-bound lawyer, hoping to get a checklist to prove he was good enough, approached Jesus and asked, “What must I do to inherit eternal life?”

Like a wise rabbi, Jesus didn’t give an answer, but countered the question with his own question, “What is written in the Law?  How do you read it?”

The lawyer was thrilled, because he knew the answer to that one!  Proudly, he rattled off something he learned in the synagogue  as a child years ago, “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind.”  Then he added, “And, love your neighbor as yourself.”

“Bingo!” said Jesus.  “You nailed it!  You said it right.  Now, DO it!”

The lawyer was startled.  The conversation was moving fast from theory to real life application.  He wasn’t so sure he liked the direction this was going, and got defensive.”

“But. . ..  But. .  . who is my neighbor anyway?”

He wasn’t asking in order to find a neighbor to love.  Instead, he was asking “who is NOT my neighbor?  Who can I exclude?”

Jesus would have none of that, so he responded with a story.

“A man, traveling to Jericho, was attacked by robbers, beaten and left for dead beside the road.

A priest hurried by.  He was late to church.  When he saw the broken, bleeding victim, he thought, “That’s sad.  I wonder what he did to deserve that” and passed on the other side.

Another religious guy a local politician, approached him, and, horrified when he was the battered man, thought, “We need to have a discussion about violence in our community.  At the next council meeting, I’ll see if we can form a committee to look study it.”  Then, he scurried on his way.

Finally, a Samaritan passed by.  (Samaritans were considered half-breed outcasts in their culture.  All the characters in the story so far would have looked down their noses at him — especially the lawyer who asked the question in the first place.)   The Samaritan stopped and helped the injured man.  He bandaged his wounds, put him on his own donkey and carried him to a safe and comfortable place to heal.

Now, who was the neighbor in this story?”

The lawyer realizing there was only one correct answer here, replied, “The one who showed mercy.”

And Jesus smiled and said, “You are right — and THAT is what you need to do.”

The lawyer started the conversation by asking “Who is my neighbor?”

Jesus ended the conversation by asking, “Whose neighbor are you?”

100 Preachers

(c) DACS; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

“Give me one hundred preachers who fear nothing but sin and desire nothing but God, and I care not whether they be clergymen or laymen, they alone will shake the gates of Hell and set up the kingdom of Heaven upon Earth.”

–John Wesley, Letter to Alexander Mather

A Life that Preaches

Daddy was a preacher.  On Sunday mornings, he thundered truth from the pulpit — and sometimes the thunder came in a whisper.  He whispered a word of grace which quietly entered our hearts and then thundered on the inside.

Some preachers yell because there’s no substance.  It’s loud, but hollow and doesn’t sink any further than the earmuffs.  But Daddy’s message always sank deep into the soul and then exploded.

He wasn’t eloquent.  Reading was a struggle for him, and he never attended seminary.  Sometimes, he felt inadequate.  But Daddy was equipped.  Although he never finished high school, he was admitted to God’s Bible School, and graduated with honors and served a full life of effective ministry.  His sermons, though simple, were always powerful and transforming.

I think the main reason for Daddy’s effectiveness in the pulpit was not his oratorical or homiletical skills.  Instead, it was because his whole life preached.  What he was on Sunday morning behind the pulpit was what he was Monday through Saturday.  He lived a life overflowing with holy love, gratitude and praise.

As he put life into his words, he put his words to life.

I thought of Daddy when I recently read these words by J. Wesley Ingles:

 “Every abstract word is hollow until we pour life into it. Honor, glory, sacrifice,loyalty, love, joy, peace, courage and endurance, faith and faithfulness, democracy and brotherhood, justice and mercy- what are these?

Words. Abstract words. Hollow words- until we fill them with deeds, with life, and hence with meaning…

The great words of the Christian faith—grace, forgiveness, redemption, faith, hope and love—are all hollow words until we pour our Christian experience into them.

Yes, the great words are hollow; and yet filled full of life, they could shake the world again as they have done in the past, not as disembodied sounds, however correct, but as poured-out life penetrating to the heart of the world.”

Especially in this day and age, it would pay Christians to practice what they preach.  Rick Warren said that often when people observe Christians, they don’t see the hands and feet of Jesus.  Instead they just see a big mouth.

Mary Ruth Penn, my Sunday School teacher during my high school years said, “what you do speaks so loud I can’t hear a word you are saying.”  The truth of that teaching just floated on the surface and didn’t sink in for quite some time.  But eventually, like Daddy’s sermon, it detonated in my heart and now, almost 40 years later, it is at work in me.

The other day, I looked at myself in the mirror and saw my father staring back.  As I age, I look more like him and hope, when I grow up, I’ll look more like him on the inside too.

Truth remains just a concept that doesn’t change anything until we bring it to life.

Live the Adventure!

You can’t enjoy the summit if you don’t climb the mountain.

You can’t parachute and stay in the plane.

You can’t take the dive if you don’t get off the board.

You can’t enjoy the story if you don’t open the book.

You can’t steal second with a foot on first.
You can’t score a touchdown and stay in the huddle.

You can’t ski the hill if you don’t take the lift.
You can’t take the train if you don’t buy the ticket.
You can’t catch the fish if you don’t cast the line.

You can’t sing your song if you don’t open your mouth.

You can’t understand if you don’t open your mind.
You can’t walk on water if you don’t step out of the boat.

You can’t love if you don’t open your heart.

You can’t get in shape if you don’t exercise.
You can’t enjoy nature if you don’t leave the house.

You can’t fly if you don’t spread your wings.

You can’t get anywhere if you don’t make a decision

You can’t live the adventure if you don’t take a risk.

Playing it safe is the surest way a boring, humdrum life.  Too many of us have  unfulfilled dreams packed away deep in our hearts but we are afraid to bring them out and explore them.   It’s too frightening to do something extraordinary.

 So, rather of taking bold steps of daring faith, we settle for Netflix and video games.  Instead creating a great story, we are content with consuming stories of others — watching reruns from the sofa.  But we are not really content.

We weren’t created to sit around and watch the world go by. The reason why life often seems unfulfilling is because we have never take the chance to really live.

 Maybe it is time to get off the couch,  step out in faith, and experience the adventure!

Gladys Dunn Goes to Church

A woman named Gladys Dunn was new in town and decided to visit the Church closest to her apartment. She appreciated the pretty sanctuary and the music by the choir, but the sermon went on and on. Worse, it wasn’t very interesting.. Glancing around she saw many people in the congregation nodding off.

Finally it was over. After the service, she turned to a still sleepy-looking gentleman next to her, extended her hand, and said, “I’m Gladys Dunn.”

“You and me both!” he replied.

(Thank you to my friend, Allen Weiner, who sent this funny to me.)